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The Mass Media

The Mass Media

Ask Bobby #12
September 25, 2023

Boston’s Classic Performance of “The Nutcracker” Still Killing It After 50 Years

“The Nutcracker” has been a long-standing tradition for the Boston Ballet. The production has been around for nearly 50 years since the Boston Ballet itself was first opened to the public, making the production one of the most well-known and well-publicized pieces.
On November 27, “The Nutcracker” had its first opening night. Guests of all ages were eagerly waiting to the see the show and not a seat was left empty at the Boston Opera House. The night delivered two different acts; the first composed on the “Prologue,” the “Party Scene,” “Battle Scene” and “Snow Scene.” As for the second, it was composed of the “Nutcracker Prince’s Kingdom,” “Waltz of the Flower” and the “Grand Pas de Deux,” all in all, a 2-hour production with an intermission in between.
The show was under the direction of Mikko Nissinen, who has been with the company for more than 10 years and over 40 nutcracker performances just this year. This year’s production had about 70 professional dancers and 200 talented students from the Boston Ballet School.
Under Nissinen’s direction, “The Nutcracker” tells the story of Clara’s perilous journey away from home and into the Kingdom of the Nutcracker Prince and then back. The production first shows Clara walking outside amongst the homeless children waiting for Dr. Drosselmeier to open his toy shop.
The production then fluidly transitions to the next scene where family and guests of Clara’s are gathered at home celebrating Christmas and receiving a Nutcracker Doll. Soon after the guests leave, the Nutcracker Doll turns into a handsome prince who accompanies Clara on her perilous night through the Nutcracker Prince’s Kingdom.
Their adventure was filled with sword fighting, earned by Clara for defeating the Mouse King, balloon ride to the castle and various rewards from the prince from around the world. The show ends with Clara gleefully waking up in her living room next to the Christmas tree with the Nutcracker Doll that she slept with.
This year’s production of “The Nutcracker” was highly anticipated for a good reason. Not only was the choreography on point, but the stage and light show was a remarkable piece itself. Mikki Kinttu, the designer of both the stage and lighting added some features that resembled the chaotic land through which the troubling adventure of Clara took place.
This year’s production of “The Nutcracker” will be held at the Boston Opera House from November 27 to December 31 with about 50 different times. For more information check out Bostonballet.com.