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The Mass Media

The Mass Media

The Mass Media

Institute of Contemporary Art displays abstract exhibit: ‘Amy Sillman: one lump or two’

The exhibit consists of a body of works that Sillman has created over the past 25 years. The works are displayed chronologically from room to room, organized from her older to most recent paintings.

The exhibit consists of a body of works that Sillman has created over the past 25 years. The works are displayed chronologically from room to room, organized from her older to most recent paintings.

If you are looking for some fulfilling art entertainment and food for thought, heading over to the Institute of Contemporary Art of Boston (ICA) is your best option. Amy Sillman, a New York based artist, will have her abstract exhibit, “Amy Sillman: one lump or two,” on display through Jan. 5.
Sillman is not only an established artist, but she is also the head of the painting program at Bard College’s MFA program. The collection of pieces included in this exhibit were chosen by Sillman herself and Helen Molesworth, the curator of the ICA.
The exhibit consists of a body of works that Sillman has created over the past 25 years. The works are displayed chronologically from room to room, organized from her older to most recent paintings.
Sillman uses different mediums ranging from simple colored pencils to inks and dark paints, to bright oils and acrylics. Her work has an overall satirical and sarcastic vibe. According to the ICA staff, you may find yourself laughing or smiling while admiring the honesty and raw qualities of her works.
There is a personal feel to the exhibit as if you are peeking into someone’s mind, where you get to see things that you would not ordinarily see or know by simply looking at a person. Sillman’s use of people, body parts, faces, and sarcastic diary entry-type notes and seating charts serve as a ticket into Sillman’s world. It is possible you will forget where you are all together when visiting her exhibit.
Sillman finds inspiration from other artists, particularly Philip Guston. While she is known as a painter, there is a distinct drawing focus visible in her pieces. Aside from her career in painting, she also has a background in publishing and enjoys returning to her drawing routes to create Zines, a cartoon-style of storytelling.
Recently, Sillman has been known to use a painting app for iPhone, and then print and paint over her digital creations, according to the ICA staff. She is admired for her emphasis on instinct while painting.
Viewing her pieces is a liberating experience because the works on display are being presented in an up close and personal format. The strokes are visible and the pieces are placed mostly at eye level, which makes it feel very accessible.
Interested in seeing it all for yourself? Admission at the ICA is only $10 with a valid student ID, or free if you go on a Thursday after 5 p.m.
The ICA also hosts events for those 21 and over on the first Friday of every month, including gallery talks, DJs, specialty drinks, and snacks. Cocktails inspired by the current exhibit on display are served, and there is a free admission for ICA members.
You can find more information on this, as well as exclusive peeks into the Sillman exhibit, on icaboston.org