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UMass Boston's independent, student-run newspaper

The Mass Media

The Mass Media

The Mass Media

Stop making students fund the construction!

Improvements+around+campus+are+always+welcome%2C+but+fee+increases+arent
Improvements around campus are always welcome, but fee increases aren’t

Over the past few years, the University of Massachusetts Boston has been expanding its campus with the Integrated Sciences Complex and General Academic Building No. 1.
The growth of UMass Boston means more classes and professors, but how exactly is the school paying for this? The estimated cost of the two projects together is $265 million.
According to UMass Boston, the state of Massachusetts has provided funding for 15 percent of the projects, which include new parking facilities and renovations to the Harborwalk.
So, what about the $225 million difference?
For starters, there’s the parking fee, which is one of the most blatant revenue-based fees imposed on students. The majority of students commute (because who wants to pay $800 for a 2 bedroom apartment with 3 roommates in Dorchester?), and for these students, driving is the most convenient mode of transportation.
In part due to the pressures of being environmentally friendly, the school seems intent on dissuading students to drive to UMass Boston by charging $6 per day.
Examine the breakdown of tuition and fees — the fees cost more than the tuition itself!
For an in-state student the tuition rate is $71.50 per credit, while education operation fees and other fees amount to about $427.50 per credit. Prices increase substantially for out of state and international students.
UMass Boston is advertised as affordable. However, tuition bills are laced with hidden fees and expenses in addition to the inexpensive rate of $71.50 per credit.
New buildings are great, but students should not be responsible for the bill. Even if $20,000 per year isn’t comparatively a lot of money to pay for college, it makes it more difficult for people that want to go to school to afford it. The majority of the students who attend UMass Boston are not traditional students. A vast majority of students already have to work insane amounts of hours to afford the fees.
Increasing fees, despite the nobility of the reason, isn’t doing anyone any favors.
The school seems to be reaching out to a different demographic from their initial target: middle class students who would normally prefer to choose to attend private schools.
Unfortunately, the brunt of this action is being felt by students currently enrolled, who continually have to take out larger loans in the hopes of someday graduating.