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The Mass Media

The Mass Media

Thai authenticity found at S&I Togo in Allston

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Drunken Fried Rice with Thai Ice Tea in the back 

When people think of Boston they often think of Fenway Park, Good Will Hunting, and clam chowder. What people don’t usually think of is the ethnic food scene in this historical harbor city. Like most northeastern cities, Boston’s winter can be rather unforgiving, but that doesn’t mean you can’t have an authentic taste of Southeast Asia at an affordable price. S&I Togo in Allston is the cozy haven that winter-dwellers should escape to. Those wishing to stimulate their taste buds will find themselves properly satisfied as well.
S&I Togo has no more than six tables, seating about 12 people total. Walking through their front door you’ll immediately know this place is well-loved by the community. From the dressed-up, to those who wish to find themselves through cross-country backpacking, you’ll find a spectrum of people eating at the restaurant. S&I Togo is owned by a Thai family from the northern part of their homeland, and according to the nephew of the restaurant owner, their food is less spicy than those from southern Thailand. Regardless of that, S&I Togo still delivers their take on what Thai food is all about—warmth.
Pad Thai, the most iconic dish that every Thai restaurant is judged upon, is a stir-fried rice noodle dish with eggs and shrimp. At S&I Togo, their pad thai is cooked with playful sweet-and-sourness, just like what you’d find on the streets of Thailand—with a sprinkle of peanuts, basil leaves, and a splash of lemon juice, making the mouthwatering shrimp just that much more succulent. Chefs from S&I Togo are sinfully good at mixing flavors from Vietnam, Cambodia, and Southeastern China, reminding you why this adorable restaurant is a must when one visits Allston.
Pad kee mao, commonly known as drunken noodles, is a Thai dish with a Chinese signature. Chinese immigrants living in Thailand and Laos brought with them the simple dish from home. It was later adapted by the locals, adding soy sauce, fish sauce, plus a generous supply of chili and basil. The various seasonings create a flavor profile that emphasizes its spiciness. Fresh ingredients in every dish are an expected standard at S&I To go. The only complaint about this restaurant is the lack of room, and the small store front often gets overwhelmed with cold wind when one opens the front door. But somehow, you’ll find yourself forgiving them over and over again. What they lack in size, they make it up with good service and the superb, authentic taste of Thailand.
S&I Togo is one of the few Asian restaurants in Boston that truly cares about their cultural authenticity, and since most of the foods there traces its roots to the streets of Thailand, the restaurant also fits what you’d call a “dingy little joint.” Call it whatever you might, but S&I Togo is cozy, authentic, and unpretentious.