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An inside look at Bobby B. Beacon’s insides. Illustrated by Bianca Oppedisano/ Mass Media Staff.
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February 26, 2024

Panic! at the Disco Plays Free Show at City Hall Plaza

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Panic! at the Disco (1)

“Let’s Kill Tonight” is apparently more than just the name of a Panic! at the Disco song––it’s more of a mantra and self-fulfilling prophecy because Panic! Killed! It! So much exclamation, so little time. As it so happens, it’s earned. During their performance of “Let’s Kill Tonight” it seemed as if frontman Brendon Urie would kill his vocal cords, hitting notes that didn’t seem to exist before. There might just be a new adaptation of the Julie Andrews’ hit song about her favorite things appearing in the near future so that it can include good, free music––because these are definitely “a few of my favorite things.” Panic! at the Disco played at Boston City Hall Plaza on the stomping grounds of Boston Calling (which is coming right up!) but with Panic! as the main act, they were allowed a more intimate show––with your closest few thousand friends. 
Something about Panic! at the Disco is timeless. Maybe that’s because it’s one of those bands that endured those high school years and their persistence keeps their fans young with nostalgia––or maybe it’s just that Brendan Urie has a unique and amazing voice that lends itself to the band’s merit. Urie certainly showcased the range of his voice that evening by peppering in respectably ambitious cover songs, most notably, “Bohemian Rhapsody” by Queen, which happens to be one of Brendan Urie’s favorite songs to cover in general. Based off of the audience reaction, it was one of their favorite cover songs too. To pick a favorite is no easy task among various other fan-favorite covers like “Any Way You Want it” by Journey and “You Shook Me All Night Long” by AC/DC that Panic! performed at City Hall Plaza.
A lot of Panic! at the Disco’s song titles can be taken literally, it seems, and leading off with “Time to Dance” as their opening song set the pace for the audience, and made it explicitly known what was expected of them: dance, have fun, and sing along. In response, the audience could be heard singing louder in unison when the lyrics “This is screaming!” came up, because Bostonians are so witty. As if in response, Brendan Urie implemented the use of typical Boston rhetoric for a more personal touch to the performance by referring to the audience as “wicked gorgeous.” The feeling was mutual. Of course, they played the classics like “I Write Sins, Not Tragedies,” but this news writer has used up their quota for turning song titles into puns and references to literal events.
In addition to some of their classic hits, Panic! pulled out their new single, “Hallelujah” from their upcoming fifth album release. The new single is their second song to hit the Top 40 music charts after “I Write Sins, Not Tragedies” back in 2006. The tone of the song is reminiscent of the religious theme heard in one of their previous songs, “This is Gospel.” The new album doesn’t have a title yet, but according to Brendan Urie, it might be named after the single, “Death of a Bachelor” which pulls inspiration from Frank Sinatra. The new songs and teasers from the show give rise to the anticipation for the whole album to be released.
Sure, these teasers are online; and sure, by now audiences know Brendan can sing. What people watching from home can’t get first-hand is Brendan’s sense of humor. Urie concedes that most people might not get his humor, such as when he noticed a portion of the audience not laughing at his references to the Chris Farley film “Black Sheep.” In fact, he admits he might have dated himself with his Farley jokes, but without it, there are no signs of aging otherwise. Panic! at the Disco continues to prove their ability to stay relevant and keep a youthful sound even after almost a decade, withstanding the test of time.