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The Mass Media

The Mass Media

The Mass Media

Mayor Walsh Absent at Preliminary Election

Boston+Mayor+Marty+Walsh.

Boston Mayor Marty Walsh.

With only a few days left before ballots are cast in the preliminary mayoral election, Boston Mayor Marty Walsh is falling short on his promises. Even though it was announced that Walsh would participate in the upcoming debates because it was the “democratic” thing to do, as it turns out, he will not be participating in them.
The debates were to include all four contenders for the mayor for Boston. Instead, voters can look out for three of those four contenders arguing why they are the best fit for the position. These contenders are Councillor Tito Jackson, Robert Cappucci, and Joseph Wiley.
Gabrielle Farrell, Walsh’s campaign spokeswoman, announced in a statement that Walsh will spend the week—days before the election—continuing his duties as mayor. In a quote obtained from the Boston Globe, Farrell mentioned, “At this point, we don’t see how it’s possible to plan a debate before the preliminary that would work with all four candidates’ schedules.”

The mayor’s campaign team confirmed that they have received invitations from major news organizations in Boston for a much anticipated Walsh-Jackson debate. However, his team has declined invitations for a preliminary debate that would include all four candidates.
 It is evident that voters want to see a debate between Walsh and his contenders. News organizations went ahead to propose a series of debates. Reportedly, the Boston Globe, along with NBC Boston, WBUR Radio Station, Telemundo Boston, and NECN, all pushed for a scheduled debate between Walsh and Jackson.
The proposed dates would have been on Sept. 12, before the preliminary elections, and the second debate before the election on Nov. 7, between Walsh and Jackson. These debates were only proposed because no official confirmations were given. The McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies at the University of Massachusetts Boston was also part of this collaborative effort.
It was the conglomerate, signed by Robert Turner, a member of UMass Boston’s McCormack Graduate School Community, and Tom Melville, the Executive News Director of WBUR, who received declination from Walsh’s campaign to the proposed debates.
It was alleged that Walsh insisted that all four candidates debated and as a result, two other scheduled debates were proposed. But later, Walsh’s campaign was reluctant to accept the invitations to those debates as well.
However, Turner and Melville’s group is hoping to broadcast a debate on Oct. 25 on Telemundo Boston, even though Walsh’s campaign still has not shown any formal commitment.
Walsh’s refusals to accept these debates has stirred conversation among Boston residents and Walsh’s contender, Jackson. Boston residents have shown concern as to why Walsh has declined invitations. In addition, according to an interview with the Boston Globe, Jackson said of Walsh, “He is showing a disregard and disrespect for the voters of the city of Boston and democracy by not participating in a debate with all of the candidates.”