72°
UMass Boston's independent, student-run newspaper

The Mass Media

The Mass Media

The Mass Media

Boston Comic Con Looks Toward The Future

Emily+Lockard+and+Sean+McLean+with+Daredevil+at+Boston+Comic+Con
Emily Lockard and Sean McLean with Daredevil at Boston Comic Con

For the tenth straight year, nerds united in the city of Boston for its annual Comic Con extravaganza. Everyone from the Trekkies to those who wish to be in a galaxy far far away, and even the people that believe winter is coming lined up at the Boston Exhibition and Convention Center in South Boston. This was the first time in the 10-year history of the event that it was held in the massive venue, just steps away from its former home at the World Trade Center. Although the “Revenge of The Nerds” type festival always had its charm in the smaller venue, it was much more enjoyable in the more open quarters of its new home.
With Fan Expo now coordinating the event, fans were expecting Comic Con to be more driven by guests from TV and film rather than comics. Although it maintained some solid appearances from years prior, the sheer volume of actors from Marvel, Doctor Who, etc. grew by a good margin, while the volume of notable comic book writers and artists decreased by a good amount. While the event featured appearances from writers such as Neal Adams, Tom King, Andy Kubert, and Ken Lashley, the number of notable actors from some of fans favorite shows and movies was clearly a bigger draw.
There was someone for almost everyone to see. From Charlie Cox (Daredevil, Defenders), to Matt Smith (Doctor Who), and even a return appearance from John Barrowman (Arrow, Doctor Who, Torchwood), who has become a fan favorite at comic conventions all over the world. However, the biggest draw was Stan Lee, who was billed as making his final East Coast appearance. Fans lined up to meet and greet the legendary creator partly responsible for Spider-Man, Iron Man, The Fantastic Four, and virtually everything about Marvel Comics as we know them.
            Now, obviously, the event ran into its fair share of problems as it adjusts to its new quarters. For example, the photo and autograph area was run very well; however, it came at the expense of artist alley, which was very cramped and had disorganized line formations. This is obviously just some of the growing pains that were sure to happen as the event continues to grow. The positive side is that they only used one hall of the huge venue, so there is even more room for BCC to grow for years to come.
Overall, Boston Comic Con did not disappoint. The event delivers as the gathering for fans in Boston who can’t afford to travel to bigger events like Wizard World or San Diego Comic Con. The weekend of Boston Comic Con provides a small, intimate gathering of fans in the city who get to meet writers, artists, and actors that are responsible for their favorite characters. If the event continues to stay within that realm for its programming and features, it will always be a unique festival in the city of Boston…although it is great to not be elbowed 75 times by a perfect stranger in one afternoon.
The weekend’s festivities were clearly an upgrade from years prior, and served as a great basis for growth that attendees can expect for the future.