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The Mass Media

The Mass Media

The Mass Media

‘The Vagina Monologues’ draw capacity crowds at Black Box Theater

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‘The Vagina Monologues’

The University of Massachusetts Boston’s Women’s Center and Department of Performing Arts put on a phenomenal production of “The Vagina Monologues” on Thursday, March 6 and Friday, March 7 in the Black Box Theater in the McCormack Building.
I arrived two minutes after the show had started on Thursday, and it was already full to capacity. I knew then that I must be in for a real treat. Friday I made sure to arrive early, and there was still a long line of eager attendees. Luckily they were able to move the show into a bigger theater and accommodate everyone who was already in line and those who were on their way to the show.
Eve Ensler’s ”The Vagina Monologues” has been performed all over the world and in many different languages. The production explores the female experience through stories, both tragic and triumphant. “The Vagina Monologues” is a skit to make people aware of the things women go through because of what they have between their legs.
One skit was told from a little girl’s perspective of what her vagina would wear or say to an elderly woman who is not comfortable enough to even say the word “vagina.” 
The production touched on topics ranging from sexual abuse to how women should embrace their womanhood through their vagina — being proud that they have one and feeling comfortable enough to become their vagina’s voice to the world.
The audience responded warmly to each woman and their character, especially judging from the non-stop laughing during the “My Angry Vagina” skit, and the silence that fell over the audience as we listened to “My Vagina Was My Village.” The audience connected to each character in many different ways, and listened to their stories as the actresses brought them to life.
The Women’s Center at UMass Boston put on “The Vagina Monologues” expecting only a couple of people to be interested, but to their surprise, twice as many people attended. Although the monologues were once controversial, the themes and issues are ones that will be talked about forever.