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The Mass Media

The Mass Media

The Mass Media

Late Payment: Missed Wedding

What would you do if you got a bill for a wedding you couldn’t attend?
As crazy as it sounds, a woman named Jessica Baker and her husband lived the experience. The Baker’s were planning on attending a relative’s wedding but had to cancel due to babysitting issues.
Jessica’s mother, the scheduled babysitter for the children, had to cancel at the last minute. This caused Jessica and her husband to miss the wedding.
You may have the same thought I did: just bring the kids to the wedding! But this one was a special one –it was a no children zone. What else could they had done? Certainly, the children could not be left alone at home, and to bring unsolicited children to a wedding specifically asking for their removal would be rude.
Baker and her husband were looking forward to having a night out. When Baker’s mother called to cancel, she informed the couple that Baker’s niece, her granddaughter, had come down with hand, foot and mouth disease and she, Baker’s mother, had been exposed. To babysit Baker’s children the night of the wedding would mean exposing them to the disease.
The couple decided not to reach out to the couple regarding their absence so as to not bother them on their wedding day. They know from experience: when the Baker’s got married, they couldn’t have been bothered with phone calls or text messages. They assumed the same of the family member getting married.
They had intentions of telling the couple later on of the freak incident deterring them from attending the wedding.
Now, back to the bill. The total came out to $75.90. The footnote on the letter informing the couple of the bill read, “This cost reflects the amount paid by the bride and groom for meals that were RSVP’d for. Reimbursement, explanation for no show, call, or text would be appreciated.”
Sounds a bit rude.
The Baker’s have no intentions on paying the bill, especially when they were placed in such a predicament out of their own control.
We go back to our original question: What would you do if you got a bill for a wedding you couldn’t attend?