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The Mass Media

The Mass Media

The Mass Media

Students Should Be the Campus Vendors, Not Businesses

Unless you have never been in the Campus Center, I’m sure you are aware of the vendors that occasionally grace the halls of the second floor. In case you haven’t gone into the Campus Center, on certain days vendors are there that sell a variety of products: jewelry, clothing, bags, etc. From what I’ve observed so far, the items being sold are reasonably priced, for an Etsy shop or a craft fair. However, for your typical college student, the prices are outrageous. UMass Boston shouldn’t let vendors come into the school and sell expensive products: we should buy that stuff on our own time and off campus.
This doesn’t mean I’m totally against the vendors. But I am against the ridiculous price UMass Boston charges to allow vendors to sell their items. To rent a 12’ by 6’ space for the day costs $200.00. Granted, UMB does supply two 6’ foot tables and two chairs, but the $200.00 fee would make it impossible for students to sell their own items.
I personally sell stationery and was looking into getting a table. But the $200.00 daily fee makes that impossible for me to do.
If UMass Boston wants to allow vendors to sell their items they should also make it possible for their actual students to sell too. In fact, I think it would be a good idea to have one day per month – maybe even one day per semester – where student vendors are allowed to sell their crafts. I am a lot more willing to buy items from my fellow classmates, who I know need the extra cash, than from vendors who can sell elsewhere.  
I asked on Facebook what my fellow classmates thought of the vendors. Several other students expressed interest in selling their own handmade items. However, it’s not widely known that students do have the option of selling; it’s just that the school makes it impossible for us to do so.
When I asked on Facebook, most of the students that replied had no problem with the vendors selling their products. Some students were pleased with the fact that vendors were from local businesses or that they were selling fruits and vegetables. A few students expressed how much they liked buying the posters.
But not all students liked that vendors are able to sell their items on campus. One student (name withheld) expressed how schools are already run like businesses: “we don’t need more people trying to take advantage of the students that go here.” They also commented that if the vendors brought money to the school it would be a whole different story. Ultimately, they would like school run vendors so the money they spent would at least be going towards the school.
However, I only got opinions from seven students. Needless to say, I am not sure what the majority of the UMass Boston student population thinks of the vendors. In the end, my personal opinion is that UMass Boston needs to make it easier for students to sell their own handmade goods. After all, the people who really need the money are students themselves.