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The Mass Media

The Mass Media

The Mass Media

Carl Joseph scores 1,000th point

Joseph+has+been+a+star+at+UMass+Boston+since+2011
Joseph has been a star at UMass Boston since 2011

For college basketball players, reaching the 1,000 point mark is an amazing feat. But in order to get there, it takes immense talent, mental toughness, and relentless hard work. Very few athletes can say that they are members of this exclusive club.
University of Massachusetts Boston’s Senior captain, Carl Joseph, recently surpassed that mark on Dec. 13, in a home game against Rhode Island College. Prior to Joseph, only eleven players in UMass Boston’s history have reached 1,000 points, the most recent being Amigo Paniagua in 2008.
Joseph is ecstatic to be a part of UMass Boston’s basketball history. He has always envisioned his name permanently stitched into the 1,000 point banner, high in the rafters of the Clark Center. More importantly, he wants to see a team banner up there. “I have never played with such a great group of players and coaches,” said Joseph. “The team has incredible chemistry on and off the court (…) it’s great being part of the program.” Currently, the Beacons are 10-9 and Joseph is optimistic about a playoff run.
Joseph is a “face-up 4.” This is a type of power-forward who likes to play with his body facing the hoop. His play style and ability draws parallels to the game of Rudy Gay. Both are extremely athletic and have the ability to drive to the hole while being a three point threat. Similar to Gay, Joseph’s three point efficiency makes the defense have to respect the perimeter. This in turn clears the lane and allows him to attack the paint. On the other end of the ball, his wingspan and speed allow him to be a lockdown defender, while his height helps protect the rim. Seeing him in the paint is a deterrent of driving to the lane for the opposing offense.
Joseph may be capable of scoring over 1,000 points, but he is also a defensive workhorse that doesn’t limit his talent to one side of the game. His effort, both on the offensive and defensive end of the ball, is clearly displayed in his stats.
Currently, Joseph is averaging about 33 minutes per game. In that time he is putting up about 19 points, 2.5 assists, and only 2.5 turnovers per game. Not only are his numbers good, but his percentages are extremely efficient. His overall field goal percentage is the highest among all starters at 50%. From beyond the arc, Joseph is shooting just above 40%. Most of the Beacons games have been decided by extremely thin margins, and efficient shooting is crucial in the final minutes.
On the other end of the ball, Joseph is averaging 1.5 blocks per game and has about 2.3 steals per game. As a rebounder, Joseph collects the team’s second most boards per game, averaging roughly 7.5.
To put up these type of numbers, not only do you have to be skilled, you have to have an intense passion for the game. Well, Joseph isn’t lacking passion or skill. He eats, breathes, and lives basketball.
“My father used to give me advice on the game (…) how to win, and how to compete” said Joseph. “He told me that as an athlete we need butterflies. If we are not nervous before a game then it’s no longer fun and we no longer compete.” 
Winning isn’t easy though. Joseph understands that in order to succeed it takes many people, and no one can do it alone. “I think Gregory Young and I really gel on the court. Our games compliment each others,” said Joseph. “When I am not at my best he seems to step it up, and vice versa. We are able to piggy-back off of one another in games.” It’s interesting to hear him say that because all great players have a partner-in-crime. A teammate who they can “piggy-back” off, a player who brings out the best in them no matter what the situation is.
Hopefully, Joseph and Young’s partnership this year can replicate the postseason success of many great duos (Shaq and Kobe, Jordan and Pippen…). UMass Boston Basketball would love to hang a 2014-15 LEC banner to accompany Joseph’s name in the rafters.