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The Mass Media

The Mass Media

The Mass Media

Building a Bigger UMass Boston

The+Intergrated+Science+Complex+is+quickly+taking+shape+after+its+ground-breaking+in+June+2011%2C+with+artist+Mark+di+Suveros+Huru+in+the+foreground.
The Intergrated Science Complex is quickly taking shape after its ground-breaking in June 2011, with artist Mark di Suvero’s Huru in the foreground.

Huru, the Mark di Suvero sculpture situated at the entrance of UMB, once seemed like a large work of steel construction. Now, it is dwarfed by the Integrated Science Complex (ISC), the building of which began late last December. The steel framework phase of construction has been completed up to the fifth floor of the new building.

According to Holly Sutherland, manager of master plan and construction communications, work on all UMass Boston’s various projects has progressed “smoothly, without major complication or delay.”

The sixth floor Wheatley building roof has new insulation and rubber. Flashing and window replacement is still ongoing. Wheatley’s fourth floor roof will have its skylights replaced. Water-damaged walls and rugs are currently being replaced on the sixth floor so professors whose offices are on that floor will still be working around construction sites, but they no longer have to step over and around trash barrels full of rainwater.

The Campus Center façade is undergoing some waterproofing and drainage repairs as well. The crack in the sidewalk in front of the Campus Center main entrance has been repaired.

“These things happen,” Sutherland said. “The Campus Center is a very busy building [and] maintenance is important. As far as the crack is concerned, it posed a hazard, especially to seeing-impaired students. Continued work on the problem will not affect students’ access to campus.”

Students will also notice cement trucks winding their way around campus on their way to the Edward M. Kennedy Institute. Similar to the construction of the ISC, large piles have been driven into the foundation supporting the Kennedy Institute. The capping of those piles with cement will begin early this spring.

Soil testing for the General Academic Building No. 1 began in the North Lot began on Martin Luther King Day. A large drill rig will dig 200 feet in 7 different locations in the North Lot. The drill rig collects soil samples at various depths. Those samples help engineers determine what kind foundation is needed to support the planned structure. Drilling is expected to last for three weeks.

Construction of General Academic Building No. 1 is set to begin in the middle of this year; the building will start housing classes in 2014 if all goes according to plan.

To accommodate for reduced parking space, the Bayside lot will open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday. To keep the cost of running the lot down -it is not automated; an attendant will have to be paid to collect people money as they enter the lot- operation hours are based strictly on demand. In the past the campuses core lots have not reached capacity until 10am and by 2pm space is once again available.

A shuttle bus will transport students from the Bayside lot from 10am until 2pm or later depending on need. Bayside will also open at 6:30 am to provide parking for construction workers, saving the more convenient parking for students.

Work on the ISC can be viewed in real-time via a bird’s eye webcam at www.umb.edu/new_event_media/construction/isc_webcam

About the Contributor
Jacob Aguiar served as the following positions for The Mass media the following years: News Editor: 2011-2012; Fall 2012 Leisure Editor: 2010-2011