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The Mass Media

The Mass Media

The Mass Media

2-20-24 PDF
February 20, 2024
2-12-24 PDF
February 12, 2024

Just Push Play

Stevie Wonder Talking Book Motown, 1972 A year after Stevie Wonder managed to wrest creative control over his music from Motown Records founder Berry Gordy, the legendary artist released this exceptional album, featuring many of his classics. Best-known tracks include “You Are the Sunshine Of My Life” and the funked-out “Superstition.” Dig deeper to uncover these gems: “I Believe When I Fall in Love” and “Blame It On the Sun.” Though less celebrated than 1973’s Innervisions, Wonder’s Talking Book is every bit as essential.             -Sean ConnellyNational Skyline This Equals Everything File 13, 2001 This second album from National Skyline features complex, melodic layering that includes atmospheric electronics, ringing guitars, and ethereal vocals over tight drum loops.  Favorite tracks are the elegaic “Water Falling” and eerie “Some Will Say.” -Shea MullaneyThe Decemberists The Crane Wife Capitol Records, 2006 I’ve been listening to the new disc from The Decemberists, The Crane Wife.  It’s a great disc with ans of the group’s Tain EP will like the title track  which is over ten minutes long and feature some truly inspired moments.  “Summersong” is also a favorite. It’s not quite as good an album as Picaresque, but it’s really good.              -Christian DeTorresRadiohead The Bends Capitol Records, 1995 Even though I bought it ages ago, The Bends is still my favorite Radiohead album. I have a bunch of their CDs, but this one definitely has the best tracks. I love The Bends (the song) and High and Dry (although totally depressing.) The last track is this haunting song called Fade Out, that’s just Thom Yorke and a guitar. Yes, Radiohead can be sad but this album has a bunch of not-so-sad, rockin’ tracks as well.     -Devon PortneyJohnny Thunders & The Heartbreakers L.M.A.F. Jungle Freud, 1977 Before there was punk, there was rock and roll. And before there was the New York Dolls and Johnny Thunders with his piss and vinegar guitar playing, there wasn’t much of an option. On this album, L.A.M.F., Thunder’s teamed up with a group of other NY hipster gutter junkies to hack out an album that has one foot in the guitar-led hook craft of Chuck Berry, and the other foot barley able to stand due to withdrawal. Highlights include “Born to Loose,” “Pirate Love,” and “Chinese Rocks.” – Denez McAdoo