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The Mass Media

The Mass Media

The Mass Media

Museum of Fine Arts Show Features Companion Mexican Exhibits

As the last days of summer fade to fall and we begin to exchange sun dresses and t-shirts for textbooks and hours hunched over computers the Museum of Fine Art might not be the first place you’d expect to find yourself. But, if you have the time a trip to the museum is well worth venturing onto the green line and spending a day amongst art might not be as painful as remembered from Middle School field trips. Currently on show are a set of companion exhibits, Viva Mexico!: Edward Weston and his Contemporaries located in the Herb Ritts Gallery from May 30th- November 2, 2009 and Vida y Drama: Modern Mexican Prints in the Clementine Haas Michel Brown Gallery also showing from May 30th-November 2, 2009, which celebrate the mediums of photography and printmaking in Mexican Art. The first exhibit, Viva Mexico!, centers around Weston, an America photographer, who arrived in Mexico during a unique window in the countries history. Right between the constitution of 1917 and the extreme industrial growth that would follow, Mexico was an agricultural society searching to define itself in the new century. In the 1920’s Weston and his lover Tina Modotti (an accomplished artist in her own right) were at the center of a burgeoning photography movement. Weston’s photos range from market scenes, urban views, landscapes, and some particularly poignant portraits including a shot of an epic Mexican cowboy staring heroically into the distance. The second show, Vida Y Drama, is a collection of prints that provide a look into the complex and turbulent political history of Mexico. Print making flourished in Mexico after the arrival of the printing press in 1539 and the images produces often convey strong political messages on racial, social, and economic equality. The issues addressed in the works are still relevant to the political climate of Mexico today as well as pertain to global problems we face. One print not to miss is Diego Rivera’s famous portrait of Zapata, 1932, a supporter of agrarian reform and a great military leader during the revolution. The famous image is also in the form of Fresco at the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) in New York City. The problem with the exhibits are their size. Both have a limited number of pieces that peak ones interest but are not substantial enough to satisfy ones curiosity. Luckily there is a number of other exciting things to see while visiting. Some highlights include a wall of TV’s showing individuals singing Madonna songs such as “Like a Virgin” and “Vogue” and the re-opening of the Rabb Gallery which now houses a collection of European Painting and Sculpture from 1900-1960. One thing to consider before visiting the the MFA is that UMASS Boston no longer has a membership with the museum (which means no free entrance) as the relationship was severed last Spring Semester due to budget cuts. The Art Department is currently trying reverse the situation, as fifteen dollars is a lot for a college student to pay for a museum ticket and art courses usually require at least one trip to the MFA. Until, or if, we re-establish out relationship with the MFA Wednesday’s are free after 4:00 pm and Thursday September 24 is Student Night. Your local library might also have tickets to museums in Boston that usually allow for you to bring one guest.