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The Mass Media

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The Mass Media

Dream Ending Robbery

Dream Ending Robbery

Nothing leaves a viewer feeling more cheated then when they fond out it’s all a dream. Isn’t that the cheapest thing you have ever seen? It’s just lazy writing to me. The author writes himself into a corner and the deadline is coming up soon so he slaps a dream ending on it and voila, a total piece of crap. Repo Men, however, is a shinning example of how to make a dream ending work.Repo Men stars Jude Law and Forest Whitaker as two organ repossession specialists, a job that offers supreme action gore and cash,  working for a company called the Union.  But when Remy (Law) ends up with a fake heart in his chest, he finds his job now strikes a little to close to home. He no longer separates himself from the people he is removing property from because now he is one of them. As he tries to cut out a man’s kidney the beating of his mechanical heart pounds in his ears and in the end he can’t go through with it. He can’t even sell people the organs because he knows what happened. The job is no longer just a job. I don’t want to spend too much time discussing the content of the movie because it speaks for itself. It has all the basics; action, gore, suspense and a love interest. The plot moves along at a good pace and heads in a lot of directions. The story pauses here and there to spotlight things like how society functions in a world where a man has the legal right to cut out your organs. It also has a bit of a redemption story embedded in it as Remy shows concern for preserving not only his own life but the life of a female singer he met while in hiding. What is really worth talking about is the end of the movie, so if you are one of those people who appreciate a spoiler alert well, there you go. So, Remy skips his payments and goes on the lamb. Eventually his old partner is sent after him. Remy is captured and using technology described earlier in the film placed in a permadream where he shall remain for the rest of his life. His dopamine and other brain chemical levels are measured and he is kept happy. This is all done courtesy of his old partner (Whitaker) who pays for the procedure. Of course, this is only revealed at the very end of the film. What the viewer sees is Remy get knocked out by his partner and then reawakening and proceeding to take down the Union cooperation with only the help of the chick he picked up earlier. The narrative follows a trend that I have seen a lot lately. Maybe it’s my movie choice,  but it happens in District 9 and Daybreakers as well as a myriad of other films and it is always wholly unrealistic. How does one guy take a whole place by storm with an impossible number of enemies and bullets flying; it just makes the hero’s success a total exercise in disbelief. So the fact that Remy’s little romp through the Union offices is a dream made it a more realistic and therefore better ending. It is rewarding as a viewer because it makes the violence much more fun to watch. Your not so concerned with the reality of the fight because it’s a dream and therefore doesn’t have to make sense. This way, that one annoying friend can’t spend the next couple hours complaining about the improbability of the movie and breaking down every minute detail about why it could never happen. Most dream endings rob you of a story. Who cares about something that didn’t even happen. The only thing more boring than listening to someone tell you about their dream is listening to someone tell you about someone else’s dream. But that’s where RepoMen is different. You see, for Remy, going back and taking down the Union happened. That’s as real as it gets. As far as he knows that’s what happened and that is what will have always happened, and his belief in it gives it validity. There is a reason for us to watch it because at least, to one of the characters in the film, that’s how the story ends. Somewhat less important, but definitely a very creative and poignant part of the 20 to 30 minutes that make up Remy’s dream, is the subtle hints at what’s going on. There are a lot of small clues like quick scenes, transition time lines not matching quite right and extraordinary occurrences, all of which give the viewer the impression that something is not quite right. Incidentally this allows the number of foes, bullets and violence to rise to an almost excessive amount. Congrats Repo Men for having what is probably the world’s first good dream ending.

About the Contributor
Jacob Aguiar served as the following positions for The Mass media the following years: News Editor: 2011-2012; Fall 2012 Leisure Editor: 2010-2011