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The Mass Media

The Mass Media

The Mass Media

Dreamers, Resolves, & Education

People dream about a vast array of things, yet they are only termed as a ‘dreamer’ if their desires are those of materialistic inconsequence. No one is called a dreamer if they desire a roof above their heads, one that will shelter them and provide the warmth that holds a semblance of security. On a trip, in the summer of 2014, to Copenhagen, Denmark, I met such a dreamer. The experience she explained to me was one that had an extreme effect upon my conscience. There she sat, back hunched in front of a dirt-blanketed wall; a cup lay between her feet, one that had probably been retrieved from a local café. Her angular features were blank, withholding any sign of emotion. She was homeless. Like any sympathetic tourist, I advanced towards her, with Danish coins in hand. Dropping them into her cup, I was met with no smile, no reaction, not even a trigger of awareness from her. She never escaped my thoughts after that. Even now, that experience permeates my mind in the hours I have to myself.  
The above experience is the catalyst for my resolve to decrease the alarming amount of those deprived of a home. The trip to Denmark changed my rationale for traveling; before, traveling for me was about aesthetic and recreational pleasure; now, when I travel, I analyze a country’s citizens, deciding if they have enough or are perishing with what they have no access to. The analyzing helps me focus on the main concerns in the world such as water access, an uneven distribution of wealth, and crime. 
The resolve will inevitably call for hard work and dedication, beginning with schoolwork. I’ve traveled the world as a child and adolescent. Traveling has changed my views upon the world; however, the simple joy that arrives when traveling has not disappeared (thankfully). I’ve realized the weight of subtle realizations. I’ve developed a deep appreciation for what I have. I’ve seen things that have built a passion and these passions have built resolves. And I fully intend to see those resolves go through.
But these resolves have crumbled in the face of an undergraduate education. I no longer focus on long-term goals. My goals are much more short term; exams, assignments, and quizzes are blurring these resolves. And this blurring is resulting in a loss of motivation and clarity. And I leave you with this question: is our education system supposed to create unmotivated students who have lost clarity with regards to their future?