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The Mass Media

The Mass Media

2-26-24 PDF
February 26, 2024
An inside look at Bobby B. Beacon’s insides. Illustrated by Bianca Oppedisano/ Mass Media Staff.
Bobby's Inside Story
February 26, 2024

New Dorms & Elevators: Student Thoughts

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Dining Hall in the East residence hall. 

On Sunday, September 2, 2018 the University of Massachusetts Boston moved in hundreds of students from all over the country. With this being the very first on-campus residence hall, there were high expectations regarding the living space and the campus spirit it would boost. With up to 12 floors, the residence halls’ rooms and views are nothing other than extraordinary. However, despite these types of assets and the positive aspects that the halls contain, there are some things that the students feel need to be addressed.
To begin, the dining commons’ hours do not coincide with most students’ schedules. As what I have heard throughout the week, amongst different groups and floor meetings, there are a handful of students that will be unable to eat dinner in the dining area due to having late classes and long labs. For example, there are labs that start around 5 p.m. and end around 8 or 9 p.m. The Campus Center food court also closes around the same time as the dining commons, ensuring no avenue for meals students can go to. In reality, these students will have to either depend on their own snacks and food that they have in their dorm, if any, or depend on the UMarket that fortunately closes at midnight. However, the UMarket is mostly filled with snacks and treats of different sorts. There are small meal options like chicken noodle soup and ramen noodles, but some of these options do not promote healthier eating for the students, while also providing very few options. Moreover, students are paying for their meal plans, but unfairly missing out on the opportunities to use their swipes. These hours need to be extended, as it is very important to encourage students not to skip any necessary meals and never to resort to easy-access junk food.
Furthermore, other complaints range from confusion with the shuttle schedule, an existing lack of communication to residents, different features being broken, and more. Personally, I have experienced the inconvenience of when the elevators break down, as there is only one section of elevators in the halls. It becomes a long wait to get onto the elevator and a line builds up in the lobby. Of course the stairwell can be used, but there are students on the top for whom this option is unsavory. There needs to be continuous maintenance of features like the elevators. And this doesn’t just apply to the specific situation with the elevators, but any situation around campus. There needs to be clear communication and continuous maintenance of features that may not be running smoothly.
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With many students discussing their opinions, I was able to talk to some students and get their thoughts on what they believed needed to be changed or improved in the residence halls or around campus.
Sam Dezalia, freshman living in the East Building, says: “I would like to see the bus schedules tended to and changed. There also seems to be a lack of buses on Route 2. The other night I was waiting 20+ minutes for a bus to get to the T stop and bring me back to the dorms.” 
Gabriella Edwards, who is also a freshman in the East Building, says: “I believe things like the elevators need to be improved. Also, if there is any way possible, we should get alerts on what is going on around campus. I would like to be more involved.”
Bryce Thompson, a freshman living in the West Building “wish[es] that there was less construction and more access to sidewalks, especially to get to classes easier.”
It must be expressed that I did not write this article to strictly bash on the residence halls and campus, because in reality, this campus has wonderful things that I believe outweigh the negatives. The education, professors, and student activities here on campus are phenomenal and they are part of the many reasons why I came to UMass Boston. I wrote this article so whoever may be reading knows that their voice is important and that you need to speak to the administration when you are having an issue or believe something needs to be addressed. Something will not change unless we, as a collective student body, speak out. Our opinions matter!