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The Mass Media

The Mass Media

The Mass Media

2-26-24 PDF
February 26, 2024
An inside look at Bobby B. Beacon’s insides. Illustrated by Bianca Oppedisano/ Mass Media Staff.
Bobby's Inside Story
February 26, 2024

The Adaptive Computing Lab

The Adaptive Computing Lab (ACL) in the lower level of the Healey Library can accommodate anyone with a disability that desires assistance when using electronic devices, and when working on assignments and tests.
The ACL opened in 1995 and was located on the lower level of the Healey Library, a few doors down from where it is now. The lab has been moved around all over the campus, finding its way back home in the library. When the ACL was originally opened, it was run by Shirley Corbet, the grant writer, and Donna Hill, the supervisor of the ACL. The ACL is funded by grants, and state funding. This lab is the first of its kind in the United States. Being that it is an ‘original’, the lab is a showcase, and is shown to people around the world.
Currently, the lab is staged by Matt, who runs the lab, and Dann, who has played a support role for the last five years. The audience for the ACL would be students with disabilities, both on and off campus, and faculty.
The lab offers many services to both students and faculty who wish to seek assistance. Regardless of your disability, the ACL can accommodate you in several different capacities. If you are visually impaired, the ACL has screen readers to assist you. ZoomText fusion tools are available to assist those with low vision. Have a learning disability and/or struggle with reading? Then the read-and-write tools can help you out. You can also check out office lens, a technology that can take pictures of documents and whiteboards, and convert it to text. If you suffer from learning disabilities such as ADD and need a quiet place to study or take a test, the ACL features a soundproof room to accommodate students. Do you suffer from seizures? The lab has minimum lighting.
Additional services include, scan to text, Dragon NaturallySpeaking software, and adaptive keyboards, mice and pointing devices. Need to print something? The ACL has a full-service print station available for students to use. The staff in the lab can also assist with evaluating websites to make sure they are ADA accessible to students. Plus, the lab can also recommend apps that can help students with academic needs.
Can’t make it to the lab? The ACL staff can help you engage in services from home, as well as on campus. If you want to come in to the lab, it shares the same hours the Healey Library has. It is encouraged that students register with the Ross Disability Center prior to using these services, but it isn’t required.
The Adaptive Computing Lab has a major benefit to the university population, by providing software to students that can run up to $200, all covered by state funding. The lab is driven by student success, and they will do whatever they need to in order to ensure students are getting as much help as they can.