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Netflix’s Hidden Gems: Italian Film “I’m Not Scared” Offers Haunting Analysis of Human Experience

We+know+youve+been+working+hard+and+deserve+a+rest.+Netflix%2C+perhaps%3F+We+all+know+what+comes+next%26%238212%3Bpawing+at+the+Trending+Now+or+Recently+Added.+Your+eyes+water+as+you+look+for+a+good+title+until+with+horror+you+think%2C%26%23160%3Bthis+feels+like+work+too.+Kick+back+and+let+Staff+Writer+Faith+James+choose+for+you.

We know you’ve been working hard and deserve a rest. Netflix, perhaps? We all know what comes next—pawing at the “Trending Now” or “Recently Added.” Your eyes water as you look for a good title until with horror you think, this feels like work too. Kick back and let Staff Writer Faith James choose for you.

I’m Not Scared: Movie Review
“I’m Not Scared” or “Io Non Ho Paura” is a 2003 Italian crime drama/mystery film directed by Gabriele Salvatores. The film is based off of a novel by Niccolo Ammaniti with the same title. As of February 18, 2016, the film is still available on Netflix.
“I’m Not Scared” is about a young boy named Michele who lives in a small town in the Italian countryside in the 1970s. One day, while exploring with friends, Michele discovers a hole by an abandoned farmhouse. He examines the hole and sees a human leg lying in the dirt. Terrified, Michele flees but tells no one about his finding. His curiosity gets the best of him, however, and as he continues his explorations, he discovers that a live human boy is trapped in the hole.
His discovery becomes a troubling tale of uncovering the truth of his town, culminating into a town-wide kidnapping conspiracy.
“I’m Not Scared” is an interesting movie, definitely considering its historical context. The film takes place in the time period referred to as the “Years of Lead.” At this point in Italian history, kidnappings and terrorist attacks were common, so the premise of the movie has a disturbing amount of truth.
In “I’m Not Scared,” the producers stress a theme of childhood innocence and the way that it can be warped. Michele refuses to share his secret, and some part of that is about his desire to hold his own: it’s clear that in the beginning he doesn’t tell anyone about the boy because it’s “his” secret and he does not want anyone taking “his” discovery away from him. It’s only when Michele (*SPOILER ALERT*) hears the adults planning to kill the young boy that he acts.
However, the audience is not deluded into thinking all of the characters of the movie are innocent.  Within the first ten minutes the leader of Michele’s group of friends, Skull, tries to get the only girl to take off her clothes because she lost a race. The film calls into question whether or not “appearing” to be innocent, as Skull does with his baby face, or to simply be a child, is enough to excuse the messy actions of human beings.
Another enjoyable thing about “I’m Not Scared” is the cinematography and the use of bright colors. Yellow and blue are the most notable colors used in the film, prominent especially in the landscapes of wheat fields and immense blue skies.
The wheat fields are the most notable of all the landscapes in “I’m Not Scared.” This particular landscape evokes feelings about the innocence of childhood in a pastoral village, as well as the threatening nature of adulthood. Depending on the scene, the wheat fields can feel either welcoming or threatening. 
All in all, “I’m Not Scared” is an intense coming-of-age film. It’s definitely worth the watch, especially for free if you have a Netflix membership.