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The Mass Media

The Mass Media

The Mass Media

Chess Invades UMass

Chess Invades UMass

Yes it is true, UMass Boston does have a Chess Club, for all enthusiasts of the game. Though the club is not often in the spotlight where students might hear about it, one does exist, and is growing in popularity. The Chess Club started last semester and meets at various times throughout the week, usually in afternoons, in the Asian Center and the Physics Club. Since the club doesn’t get much funding, there are only five chess sets and boards in the Asian Center and three in the Physics Club, though a couple more sets and boards are kept in storage in case of an unexpectedly large turnout.

The Chess Club is pushing to acquire a larger area, since the Asian Center and the Physics Club aren’t big rooms. The club is hopeful they can acquire the conference room on the fourth floor of Wheatly, located just past the Veteran’s Center and the Office of Student Services. This room, which would be designated to the club for specific times throughout the week, would accommodate them much better and give them a centralized location. This would not only make it much easier for members and those interested in joining to find one another, but the conference room would also give them plenty of space and a nice atmosphere. The Chess Club is open to anybody. Members in the club range in skill from beginners to experts, so you are bound to find at least a couple people that play at the same level as you. The members of the club are very welcoming and greatly look forward to receiving new people, so no one should feel hesitant to venture in to look for a game.

Chess is one of the longest-surviving games in human history. It has been in existence, in various forms, for better than two thousand years. Originating in India, the game was designed for military purposes, to help officers create and execute effective strategies. The game quickly spread to different countries and regions of the world, eventually becoming one of the world’s most popular and addictive games.

Almost no other game relies on strategy and the ability to think ahead several moves quite like chess. Each piece has its own unique moves and therefore its own unique roles in the game. Some pieces, like the queen, are far more valuable and maneuverable than, for example, the lowly pawn. The pawn is very limited in maneuverability, but important in its own right. The object of the game is simple; put the opponent’s king in a position where it is impossible to get out of harm’s way. When this occurs, the king has been checkmated and the game is over.

The members of the Chess Club are very passionate about the game and have a great love and appreciation for it. Those who have never tried playing it, or believe the only people who play it are stereotypical geeks, may not understand how someone could love a game like chess, but after learning the moves of the pieces and playing against someone of like skill a few times, the game does get addictive.

You may find yourself in the middle of class one day thinking about a bad move you made that cost you the game or a good move that may have won it for you. You might also begin to imagine different scenarios that could arise in a game and what you would do to overcome or take advantage of them. Take heed, chess is addictive. If you ever find yourself craving the game, then take comfort in knowing that a friendly game awaits you in the Chess Club.